INTERIM MANAGEMENT QUICK HINTS

1. DO IMPORTANT GROUND WORK
Outline what you intend to get from bringing on an Interim Manager.
Decide what latitude you will allow the Interim Manager, and ensure that you have communicated his/her role to them, his/her staff, peers, and executive management.
Don’t neglect making an outline of how the improvements put in place will remain in force after the Interim Manager completes their engagement with you.
Clearly define what is “success,” be certain that your goals are communicated, and be clear on how and when success will be measured.
2. MAKE IMPROVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES CORE GOALS
In addition to day-to-day management, be sure to make a handful of performance development tasks part of the Interim Manager’s responsibility.
Not only will these improvements help finance the cost of bringing an Interim Manager on board, but it will also serve to integrate them with your permanent team.
Nothing builds relationships and breaks down barriers faster than working toward a shared goal.
3. BENEFIT FROM EXECUTIVE EXPERIENCE
A high caliber Interim Manager with executive experience means he/she may be able to offer insight or take on responsibilities that a permanent manager might find more difficult to handle.
He/she can provide additional leverage for the executive to who they are a direct report as they are well-suited to represent and/or take on current client sponsor assignments.
Though often difficult to quantify, an Interim Manager is likely to bring experience working at a strategic level.
4. LEVERAGE YOUR RESOURCES
If you have chosen to engage an interim management through a consulting firm or placement agency, you may be able to leverage resources above and beyond the actual Interim Manager.
This may take the form of more formally engaging resources, but there will likely be an opportunity to simply ask for advice or for some specific expertise – at no additional cost to you.
In most cases, if the expertise exists within the organization, the firm will be happy to provide a few free hours, whether in hope of selling more work or just as a way to strengthen the existing relationship.
5. AVOID TRIBAL KNOWLEDGE, CREATE INSTITUTIONAL MEMORY
Where specific decisions are made, capturing the thought process for the decision, perhaps along with alternatives considered, helps create an institutional history.
Documenting processes during an interim period can provide a huge head start for the next permanent manager.
Whether it is related to a performance improvement effort or just day-to-day operations, and whether it is imminent or at some unknown point in the future, an Interim Manager should be preparing for the transition.