HUDDLES QUICK HINTS

1. MAINTAIN A CONSISTENT AND REGULAR MEETING SCHEDULE
Huddles are an effective way to improve communication, and can be held between one and five times per week.
Frequent or daily huddles may be appropriate when performance is poor, during a process implementation, or a change in management structure.
If your team is consistently meeting productivity and inventory goals, we recommend holding huddles to discuss positive progress once or twice a week.
Maintaining a consistent meeting routine will help keep staff engaged, accountable and aware of expectations.  The frequency of huddles will vary depending on the type of work and the level of team performance.
2. KEEP HUDDLES BRIEF
Huddles should take no longer than 10-15 minutes.
All able-bodied participants should stand during the huddle.
Limit the number of staff attending the huddle: typically, no more than 10-15 staff at one time.
Keeping huddles brief will limit the amount of time staff spend away from productive work and help keep the meeting focused.
3. MEET IN A WELL DEFINED SPACE
Huddles should be held away from the staff working area – typically a small meeting room or office.
When necessary to hold standups in the cubicle area, staff should step outside of their workstation.
Meeting in a defined space will enable staff to be more open while talking about metrics or issues as well as limiting any distractions.
4. BRING GOAL-ORIENTED METRICS AND REPORTS
Each staff member attending the huddle should have productivity and inventory goals, which get reported and reviewed as a team.
If no reporting exists, staff should self-report production and inventory in front of the group.
Bring and discuss department and team level operating metrics and goals.
Individual staff performance should be an open topic of conversation during huddles and will drive operational improvement.  Additional operating metrics help management and staff work together to achieve institutional and department goals.
5. STANDARDIZE THE HUDDLE AGENDA
Huddles should focus on three categories:  metrics, issues and "wow" moments.
On a limited basis, relevant institutional updates or process change announcements can be shared during huddles.
Standardizing the huddle agendas will save management preparation time and give staff consistent expectations for sharing information.